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Community Links
CITY OF CLINTON LINKS
City of Clinton

Scott Burton, Mayor

Roger Houck, City Manager

Phone: 865-457-0424

Clinton is a thriving town with a population of approximately 10,000 citizens. Clinton is in close proximity to Knoxville and Oak Ridge and has excellent access to Interstate-75 which is why the City has been popular in attracting over 40 new industries in three industrial parks over the last twenty five years.


Clinton Fire Department

Archie Brummitt, Fire Chief

For non-emergency fire assistance call 865-457-2131

 


Clinton Police Department

Rick Scarbrough, Chief of Police

For non-emergency police assistance call 865-457-3112


Clinton Public Library

Meg Harrison, Library Director

Phone: 865-457-0519

The Clinton Public Library is located at 118 South Hicks Street and is a wonderful resource for students and parents. The library staff has added a link to our school sites on my "How Do I Find Other Resources?" page. Also included is a link to the Accelerated Reader program. The students can follow the link to find AR books.


Green McAdoo Cultural Center

Marilyn Hayden, Director

Phone: 865-463-6500

On August 27, 1956, twelve young people in Clinton, Tennessee walked into history and changed the world. They were the first students to desegregate a state-supported high school in the south. Clinton High School holds the honor of having the first Black to graduate from a public high school in the South. It was a great victory for the Civil Rights Movement. The events of that school year and the years that followed are to be commemorated on the 50th anniversary with the opening of the Green McAdoo Cultural Center on August 26, 2006.


The Education Foundation for Clinton City and Anderson County Schools

Gary Whitley, Chairman

Phone: 865-463-1017

The primary goal of the Education Foundation is to raise money from area individuals, businesses and corporations that can then be utilized to enhance the education efforts in the Clinton City and Anderson County schools. This is an investment into the schools beyond what tax dollars provide, as well as what teachers personally provide to enhance their classrooms and educational efforts. The end result is fostered academic development, teacher development and rewards for academic excellence.


ANDERSON COUNTY LINKS
Anderson County Chamber of Commerce

Rick Meredith, President     

Phone: 865-457-2559

One of our many functions is to serve as a clearing house for information. We will supply you with county maps, statistical data, an industrial directory, or any type of information you need. You'll also find important information on local government, health services, education, business, and industry. We welcome you as a visitor, or as a new resident. We believe you'll like what you see.


Junior Achievement

Founded locally in 1969, Junior Achievement of East Tennessee serves students by providing a series of in-school, sequential economic, business, and free enterprise educational programs for grades K-12. Fifth graders in our school district also participate in JA Biztown. "Imagine fifth-graders as consumers rushing to the bank to deposit their paychecks, as sales clerks creating merchandise displays and as reporters interviewing local business leaders to get the most up-to-date story. Across the way the restaurant prepares for the lunch hour and the mayor meets with the workforce to get an understanding of current economic trends. This could be any city in the country, but it is an image that perfectly describes a day at JA BizTown."


Norris Dam State Park

Phone: 865-426-7461

This 4,038-acre park, located on the Norris Reservoir, began in 1933 as the first Tennessee Valley Authority project. Miles of trails lead hikers through deeply forested valleys and ridges. Many other attractions await your finding at Norris Dam State Park.


The Museum of Appalachia
 

Phone: 865-494-7680

The Museum of Appalachia is a living history museum of pioneer, frontier, and early artifacts of mountain life in the Southern Appalachians. With more than 30 historic log buildings gathered onto 63 acres and hundreds of exhibits celebrating the creativity and color of our Appalachian forebears, the Museum annually hosts over 100,000 visitors who view thousands of relics in authentic settings.